Net Neutrality: blah, blah, blah…

You’ve been hearing the term “Net Neutrality” for a while now. You sort of know it’s about keeping open access to the internet, for all. But you haven’t looked into the boring details because other people are taking care of that for you. Now… TODAY… is the time to change that.

The FCC is rolling back the Net Neutrality protections put in place during the Obama administration. Today is the day where the internet comes together to stop them. If we don’t, big cable companies (in other words, your internet providers) will control what we see and do online. Widespread throttling, blocking, censorship, and extra fees will follow.

What this will mean in the real world is an internet that ever-more-closely mirrors the extreme stratification we see offline. Small nonprofits won’t be able to get their messages out to donors and clients. Social justice activists will no longer have a level playing field to get the word out. And you–as a customer–will pay more money for an internet that is measurably worse than the one you have now.

So what can you do?

1) Take a few minutes today to really understand what we’re facing.

  • Watch and share the explainer video below
  • Visit Battle for the Net (if you don’t want to sign up for their list, just scroll down the page for tips)
  • spread the word on social media

2) Let Congress know that this FCC rule matters to you.

Is your nonprofit audience really listening—

Or are their heads somewhere else?

Get attention with nonprofit marketing tips

4 Nonprofit Marketing Tips to Get Their Attention

1)  Bottoms Up!

Nonprofit organizations used to have constituents. Now they have customers. And those customers make quick choices whether or not to support you. The younger they are, the less they tend to trust top-down sources of information. Word of mouth is trusted, which is why social engagement sites like Facebook and review websites like Yelp are so popular.

TV talk shows and radio call-in programs still work because viewers can identify with the person being interviewed, IF you know how to do it.  Print is still good for policymakers and professionals, but spokespeople are increasingly scrutinized by readers seeking to avoid spin.

2)  Opportunity Knocks!

The news hole for your issues is quite small.  Notice the fascination with celebrities. Lightweight topics claim a huge portion of space and time in traditional media. Your messages have to be edgy and sharp to break through the clutter and you must respond rapidly so you can be first in line to comment on a news event. Letters to the editor and op-eds go to those who move quickly and speak memorably. Scan the news everyday.  Search for stories that you can comment on and then be the first to submit a letter to the editor on that topic. Here’s a good example of a letter to the editor of the New York Times from Carola Bracco, executive director of Neighbors Link in Westchester County, New York.

3) Pounce and Bounce!

The Web is so dense with information that it really is more like a trampoline — tightly woven, interconnected and elastic.  Ever notice how funny emails continue to circulate year after year, or the way rumors never seem to die? That’s because communications bounce around cyberspace indefinitely.  Your messages can too. Creative use of the Web is what makes the difference between an organization that gets noticed and one that gets forgotten.

It’s not just about your website. It’s about commenting on blogs and leaving links to pertinent content. It’s about starting a fan page on Facebook and being sure that your CEO has a compelling profile on LinkedIn. Write your own blog IF you can keep it current. Consider advertising on topical blogs, sponsoring links on Google, and boosting your best Facebook posts.

4)  Be Prepared!

The Girl Scouts are right. The best way to seize opportunity is to prepare in advance.
–Write a few op-eds on key issues and file them away. As soon as one of your topics appears in the news, customize the op-ed with a timely lead paragraph and send it off before noon the same day.
–Create a single sentence that describes how your nonprofit contributes to the larger society. Whenever someone asks what you do, tell them where you work and why it matters.  Market the mission, not the minutiae.
–Update your core messages every quarter.  Don’t start with what you want to say. Think first about what gets people to listen. Too often, nonprofits are interviewed but not quoted in the final story. If you want to be quoted, say something worth quoting.
–Join with other nonprofits to make greater impact. That’s what youth organizations in New York State did for a campaign to Raise the Age of criminal responsibility. Check out the editorial they got in the Journal News.
–Get periodic message and media training for all senior personnel. The best spokespeople are always learning, no matter how much they know or how long they’ve been on the job.

On Taxes and Public Service: Being My Own Pundit

When Ben Franklin remarked that “nothing is certain except death and taxes” he didn’t anticipate the spectacle of a major party candidate bragging about being a tax dodger during a presidential debate. Donald Trump asserted that he was “smart” for not paying federal income tax. To my mind, that’s not smart at all, especially for someone who is supposedly a great business person. He should understand that taxes are our communal  investment in America and that public service is an honorable calling.

Hillary and Trump Debate Public Service

Hillary crosses into Trump territory for the initial hand shake — a varsity wrestling move.

Taxes make it possible to be a great nation. To hold elections. Conduct commerce. Make laws. Taxes pay the heating bills in the House of Representatives. They provide schools to educate workers for Donald Trump to hire. Taxes build roads and subways so people can get to Trump’s job sites. Water and sewer systems to keep Trump’s golf courses green.

Public Service versus Career Politicians

Taxes pay the salaries of public servants, whom Trump derides as “career politicians.” George H. W. Bush (R) had an outstanding public service career, serving as a congressman, ambassador, director of the CIA, vice president, and president. So did Gerald Ford (R), who served in the House for 25 years before becoming vice-president, then president due to the scandals of Richard Nixon, whom Ford pardoned at the expense of his own legacy because it was the right thing to do for the country.

Franklin Roosevelt (D) served in state and federal positions for 35 years. He was elected president a record four times, created the economic miracle that dug us out of the Great Depression, and navigated our nation through the heinous Second World War. Jacob Javits (R-NY) served in Congress for 30 years; Everett Dirksen (R-IL) for 34 and Robert Byrd (D-VW) for 51.

Well, you get the idea. And I get the point that Trump is trying to make, albeit artlessly. But there is a difference between public servants and careerists, just as there is a difference between smart businesspeople and a scofflaw huckster. And Donald Trump is the latter.